The Senior Dad Show

 

Senior Dad

Show about parenting

Host Senior Dad Stan Goldberg speaks with parents, educators, experts, and professionals offering cutting edge information about how to raise our children to succeed in the modern world.  Hear the latest scandals, disputes, best practices, and food choices from the best sources in the world.  Visit the Senior Dad Briefing Rooms that are packed with usable knowledge on teaching methods, homework, Autism, and even a special San Francisco Briefing Room.  Listen and learn.

 

 

Seth Rosenfeld was an investigative reporter for the San Francisco Examiner and the San Francisco Chronicle. But it was his work for the Berkeley University newspaper, The Daily Californian that started him on a 30 year journey that culminated in the writing of his book" Subversives the FBI's war on student radicals and Reagan's rise to power". It took five lawsuits for the FBI to release over 200,000 pages of classified information about government spying. Seth Rosenfeld joins Senior Dad Stan Goldberg and gives us some insight into his fascinating book.

Karen Siris a bullying intervention expert joins senior dad Stan Goldberg to discuss how to stop bullying behavior. Karen is the author of "Stand up" a new book to help teach kindergarten through 4th grade how to counter bullying and support positive behaviors.

During the 1980’s Todd Risley and Betty Hart conducted breakthrough research on how the number and type of words a child hears from birth to age three effects IQ and determines the child's vocabulary potential for life.  I interviewed Todd in December 2006, he passed away in December 2008, and was impressed with the amount of time that was needed to tabulate the results. Now that we are in the computer age techniques are being developed to automate the process and use the results for autism detection as well as vocabulary development. The Lena Research Foundation has invested over $50 million dollars to date for this research. Last year I interviewed one of the team Steven Warren from the University of Kansas, who shared some of the implications of the research. Later in the year I spoke with Kim Ollier from the University of Memphis another key advisor to the Lena team about the results of this new research based the original Risley/Hart research. In this show we hear all three interviews that can form the basis of our understanding of the education gap and the language and IQ we carry through life.

Lynn Koegel Co-Director of the Koegel Autism Institute of the University of California at Santa Barbara discusses the early results of new research on Autism. Cure?

Inventors are lucky if they create many inventions through their lifetime. Barry Blesser has done that. In 1960s he along with a colleague at MIT converted analog sound into digital sound and put it on a computer, thus enabling all of the digital audio technologies we experience today. Barry is also a philosopher. He describes his philosophical outlook as “plasticity” nothing is inevitable. He joins me in a Skype video interview to discuss his philosophy and how he interprets the world in which we live in. How sound affects the way we live and how different types of minds have different types of strengths. How commercial interests force us to categorize natural occurrences into medical diagnoses. Barry Blesser Author, Inventor, Philosopher, University Professor and gentle human being.

Three years ago Autism Speaks awarded Dr. Pamela Wolfberg of California State University at San Francisco the 2008 Research Award for Clinical Research for a project using Wolfberg’s Integrated Play Groups™ (IPG) model. This research involved typical children playing with children with Autism at an afterschool program. Now that research project is completed, Mariel Goldberg, age 9 ¾, one of the expert players that participated in the project joins me to share some of the things she and the other participants learned. (Full disclosure, Mariel is also my youngest daughter.)

When politicians and pundits were trying to understand the motivations of voters in “heartland” America in 2008 they read Joe Bageant's watershed book "Deer Hunting with Jesus.”  Joe grew up in Winchester, Virginia, then moved away and became a journalist. When he returned years later to write his book, Joe delved into the psyche of those he grew up with. A keen and aware observer, Joe is able to add clarity to the motivations of the working poor. Joe's insight and understanding of people is not limited to those who he grew up with. He joins me today to discuss not only the people of the heartland but why many people around the world seem to dislike Americans and why Americans, in our own myopic way, seem to be clueless. Joe Bageant, Author, Lecturer, and Marxist.

What is a learning disability?  Can you properly identify a learning disability? What should we do when our children seem to be behind in reading or math? Is it really a problem or is it just our imagination?  How do we get our children through the education process with their egos intact? Deborah Waber, researcher, clinical neuropsychologist joins me to discuss these issues among others and her new book, “Rethinking Learning Disabilities: Understanding Children Who Struggle in School”.

Mariel Goldberg shares about a new household member

A few years ago when I was investigating different methods of teaching children I encountered a teaching method that was gentle yet effective. A small widespread school district in Alaska had adopted a method of teaching where every child learned at their own pace. The method had some elements of the Glasser system which includes a heavy reliance upon choice. The method that was used in Alaska, which I called the Chugachmethod after the school district that originated it, was a definite paradigm shift. It changed the factory model of education where time is the constant and learning is the variable to a model where learning is the constant and time is the variable. I spoke with Bob Crumley the superintendent of the district and learned about the program. In the ensuing years I have spoken to many people about this method of teaching. I have to confess after this period of time I am still in enamored with the method. Bob Crumley joins me again and we discuss his districts use of this IEP for all and everyone at their own pace method of teaching.

In 2008, the San Francisco Unified School District's Special Education department decided to illegally censor the Community Advisory Committee for Special Education’s newsletter. This Committee is state-mandated to provide oversight of SFUSD’s special education department and reports directly to the  School Board. The School Board did not support the Committee and allowed the Committee to be censored.  As an aftermath of this cataclysmic event, the director of special education retired. Shortly after that, the head of the Special Education Local Plan Area (SELPA) also left the school district. After one interim special education director, in the spring of 2010, the school district engaged the services of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative to audit SFUSD’s special education department.   David Riley, Executive Director of the Urban Special Education Leadership Collaborative, joins me to elaborate on this far-reaching audit.

Stan tells us about swimming issues

I want to be happy.  I want my kid to be happy. Sound familiar? Most of us want this but getting there is something else. How do we get our kids to expect to be happy? Christine Carter the author of “Raising Happiness” joins me to chat about how we can promote happiness in our children’s lives and our own.

The greater autism community of New York State has been working on a new comprehensive autism insurance bill for two years. They gathered supporters and lobbied legislators. They had victory in sight and it all started unraveling before their eyes to become their worst nightmare. New bill less coverage. Michael Smith, Chairman and Northeast Regional Director of the Foundation for Autism Information and Research, Inc. and author of the discarded bill joins me to explain his view that Autism Speaks hired an insurance company lobbyist to replace his bill with one that is harmful to children and is designed to reduce coverage from today’s unsatisfactory levels. Is there something rotten in New York?

We are what we eat.  We are facing a national epidemic of childhood obesity, hypertension, and high cholesterol from our bad eating habits. Dr Alan Greene, author of “Feeding Baby Green” joins me in a Skype video-visit to talk about teaching children to love great food by starting them early.  Since Alan is a Pediatrician we also discuss the health and education related issues of the Autism epidemic and other health related issues.

With autism reported by the Center for Disease Control to be one percent of our population and anecdotal accounting by teachers of much higher numbers, we need to focus on strategies for early diagnosis and treatment.  Lynn Koegel Co-director of the Koegel Autism Research and Training Center of the University of California, Santa Barbara joins me in a Skype video-chat to discuss Pivotal Response Training, which has been described as a “kindlier and gentler ABA”. We also delve into several topics including some exciting new news about very early diagnosis and treatment (six months of age) of children with autism. (excerpt)

Can every child learn to read? An intriguing question. We talk like every child can learn to read equally and at the same pace. But in reality, is this true? There has been a lot of quality research into why and how children learn to read. Recently, I was fortunate to speak to Dr. Joe Torgesen, Director Emeritus of the Florida Center for Reading Research. Joe was a very likable guy and we covered many reading issues. (excerpt)

Buy fresh and support local farmers. Senior Dad Stan Goldberg visits the Alemany Farmer's Market with his family for the family's weekly visit.

Sara Bennett co-authored “The Case Against Homework” with Nancy Kalish. Both have been guests on my show in the past. On this show I share with Sara some of my homework wins and losses and she shares with us what the last 3 years running stophomework.com was like.

The Spark Program identifies at-risk middle-school students who need to be motivated by the relevancy of school and matches them with people in industry that are employed in the student’s “dream job”.  The student then becomes an intern at that profession for one semester going to the job after school hours. Chris Balme, Co-Founder and Executive Director, shares the genesis of Spark and what they are doing to reduce dropouts.  What type of job does a child want?

The Tenderloin district of San Francisco has the heaviest concentration of children in the City. It also had 2,000 violent crimes last month. Twenty-four liquor stores are in one four-block area, alongside sex shops, drug users, and the homeless.  This is the playground for 3,500 children of the urban poor. When a new liquor store tried to get permitted, community activist Barbara Lopez energized the community and developed a broad based support against the permitting. Is this the turning point in the resurgence of the Tenderloin? Barbara Lopez joins me to update me on how the community came together. She helps me understand a world so different than the world that I live in that it could well have been the moon.  Different issues. The safety of their child is a constant fear.  Where to buy food, as there is no supermarket in the Tenderloin. Barbara Lopez stands up for this community every day. Hear about cooperation and hope in the Tenderloin.

Mel levine talks of Homework

Ellie Goldberg tells us about field trips and allergies

A young reporter shares some vacation experiences

When school districts create short lists to evaluate their progress with their small schools, or want a road map to move toward small learning environments, or a coach or consultant to help them refine their small school directions, these short lists have one thing in common. That common element is Inquiry and Learning For Change, based in Oakland, California.  John Watkins, Principal of the firm joins me to talk about small schools and a wide range of topics about how our schools and learning environments are changing and the political conditions that may help or inhibit this process. John Watkins- A thinking man’s perspective.

Ellie Goldberg tells us about school food and allergies

A young reporter reveals the Tactile Dome

John C. Dvorak is an internationally renowned technology reporter and analyst.  John joins us to tell us if you can expect your paper textbooks to be replaced by digital ones shortly.

Distracted— this is a very popular word and it describes what is happening to many people in our modern world. We look at our children and see that they can't focus and we wonder whether this is caused by some medical condition or by the way we live. Commercials, technical devices, music and popular entertainment pull us in several directions. Are these the root causes of the distraction of our society? Maggie Jackson, the columnist for the Boston Globe has written a book called "Distracted". She explores this phenomena and discusses the coming dark age caused by distraction. Maggie joins me to discuss her book and explores the lives we live. Rarely will you find such an interesting and entertaining person as Maggie Jackson. It is easy to see why she has such a loyal following at the Boston Globe. Maggie Jackson—Distracted.

Mel Levine tells us about parents bribing children

A young reporter shares some preparations for a party

Amber Lamprecht

Learning and reading are unquestionably tied together.  No doubt someone can learn without knowing how to read but it makes the acquisition of information a lot harder. Amber Lamprecht specializes in teaching different types of learners how to read. One of of techniques she uses is multi-sensory learning.  We discuss this as well as how the 20 percent of our population that are dyslectic-thinkers need to be trained to use their talents to learn to read. We also focus on the effects on children when we delay addressing the issues around learning to read until later grades. Amber shares with us what parents should look for as signs that their child may need additional help in learning to read. Amber Lamprecht- it’s not as simple as ABC.

Ellie Goldberg

If your child has allergies, it is important to have the child’s school engaged as a good- health partner.  When starting a new school, the time to get acquainted with the school is the springtime before.  Ellie Goldberg shares with us in a Senior Dad Brief that lasts 10 minutes 50 seconds. “How to prepare for a new school year for a child with allergies.”

Mel Levine on bringing up minds.org

Stan and a reporter give a crop report.

Mel Levine on Individual Education plan for all.

The Sustainable Chef

Throughout his life Bryant Terry has tried many different diet plans.  As a Chef he has explored cuisine from varied corners of the United States.  Nationally known, he has participated in sustainable garden projects on both coasts and he has appeared in a featured article in the Sunday New York Times Magazine. Now a Berkeley resident, he has spoken at Alice Water’s and Ann Cooper’s school food project.

In this conversation we chat about his new book “The Vegan Soul Kitchen” as well as his cooking roots, growing organic produce at home, school food, sustainable gardening, buying local food from farmers markets and what spices to use to enliven a meal.

Teaching children language skills is always a challenge. Children all learn on their own time table.  StageWrite.org has devised methods that use the elements and techniques of theater to engage both the learner and the instructor.  We meet Elana Lagerquist, Founder and Executive Director, to learn how the program works and hear some antidotal evidence of the methods effect with instructors and at-risk students. Elana Lagerquist--Drama queens welcome.

Stan contributes to the education gap

Todd Risley, noted researcher was one of the team that named “time outs”, a tool that parents have been employing as a technique to help them retain their sanity as their children grow. Todd’s major work, along with researcher Betty Hart, was a study that showed convincingly that the more a parent talks to their child, between birth and age three, the larger the child’s vocabulary, and the higher the child’s IQ. Start behind, stay behind.

I recently learned of Todd’s passing in December 2008. As we remember the contributions of Todd I am broadcasting my interview with Todd from December 2006.  The interview was conducted while Todd was home in his beloved Alaska.  Todd told me he was at the end of the power grid, that after his house, technology ended.  He was not far from being correct.  The phone call dropped ten times during the interview and we had to pick up context and continuity on the fly. In the process I learned about his research, his misconceptions about Head Start, and the warmth and good nature of the man himself.  Although the man is gone, his research, if implemented, will help scores of children to have better lives.  Thank you Todd.

Edward Zigler is Director Emeritus of the Edward  Zigler Center in Child Development and Social Policy at Yale University. He was the youngest member of the planning committee for Head Start and later served as its director. Recently he has been a member of President Obama’s Childhood Transition Team.

Ed speaks to us about the past and the future. We talk about the persistent economic education gap, about charter schools, preschools, early childhood education, and developing integrated educational communities. Arguably there are a few educators in America as well qualified as Edward Zigler to help us chart the direction of American education for the future.

Stan tells of no more Princess’s

This show has two “Briefs”. Mel Levine chats with me about “Trust”.  I am also joined by Susan Barnes the founder of “Classes for Causes and we learn what is happening there. The last story on the show is from Mike Henry an involved parent.  We here the frightening escalation of punishment his son received from the school district and in a post script I share another “Racism” story in it’s not racism, it’s EGO.

Kris Olson was one of the founders of Parents for Public Schools in Waco, Texas. Kris has witnessed some very critical times for her city and its school system. Kris was in school when the courts ordered desegregation. In her lifetime she has seen the system go from promoting busing to discontinuing busing.  Her entire family is a product of the Waco school system. Her city has grown and learned and Kris shares with us what that journey was like.

We introduce a new feature called a brief.  This will be a self contained topic that is usually less then 10 minutes in length.  Mel Levine helps us kick off this feature with a 8:42 show about “rules”.

Michael Robinson is used to being beaten about. He was a race car driver until an unfortunate crash battered him up and ended his career. He has a child with autism and the crash energized him to focusing his future on being an advocate for all extra needs children. He is a registered lobbyist and an Internet advocate. We talk about new ways of funding special education.

stan talks about i need

Patrick Henry Hughes was born enabled. His father, Patrick John, relates that when Patrick was four months old, the sound of the piano soothed the child, and by the time Patrick Henry was a-one-year old he was playing tunes on the piano. In the ensuing years Patrick Henry learned to play the trumpet and developed his voice.  When Patrick applied to college he wanted to be in the pep band. The band director said ‘no problem’, however, all pep band members were also members of the marching band.   This was somewhat of an obstacle for Patrick since he was born without eyes and had a muscle disease that made him wheelchair-bound. His father said that he’d be willing to move Patrick around in the formations. And so what is extraordinary for some is normal for this family. We talk to the two Patrick’s and hear about their new book, I Am Potential.   Listening to the optimism of the Hughes family, where Patrick is the oldest of three boys, I can’t help but feel the strength and devotion of Patrick Henry’s parents. Eight lessons on living, loving, and reaching your dreams. 

“Home for the holidays?” Or, “let’s get this party started?” The holidays can be a stressful time for families under the best of circumstances. For your child with autism, they can be particularly difficult. Familiar routines are out the window and unfamiliar – and sometimes unfair – expectations arise at every turn. 

Listen in and hear how to empower your child with autism during this bustling time.  Internationally known award-winning author and columnist Ellen Notbohm (Ten Things Every Child with Autism Wishes You Knew) and San Francisco special needs activist Katy Franklin join “Senior Dad” Stan Goldberg in the Autism Briefing Room, explaining how the holidays effect their children with autism and their friends and families. Hear tips what to do before and during holiday parties and strategies for graceful departure. What to do about gifts and gift lists, and how to handle the lure of those attractive TV commercials?  Ellen and Katy share some of their experiences with their children and what works for them. Some of the lessons we learn apply to teaching and handling all children as well as helping us begin to understand the challenges of a family with a child with autism.

Stan tells of time going fast

When faced with a situation where a parent feels that a school system is not doing all it can for their children, some parents just complain. Some parents write letters and some parents, like Los Angeles parent Bill Ring, act.  Bill got involved.  He was on district parent advisory committee and when that was not yielding results, he started his own parent organization.  When he was not satisfied with his child’s middle school choices he worked with others to start a charter middle school.  The city rejected his application and he applied to the county. When the county rejected the application, they went to the state.  But time marched on, and his child was nearly in high school by the time the process was completed.  Now, Bill is running for School Board in Los Angeles and has started a new parent organization called TransParent®.  Bill Ring- Being quiet is not an option

Stan’s soccer story about “don’t kick the goalie”

The small school movement and the charter school movement are definitely forces that are having increasing impact on public schools.  It is hard to find a more out-spoken advocate for both of these movements as Joe Nathan.  He was active in the formulation of small charter schools at the beginning of the modern-day small-schools movement. He is the Director of the University of Minnesota Center for School Change.  The center features and promotes charter schools.  This is Joe’s first visit to a Senior Dad Briefing Room, and we discuss his background, beliefs, and define areas of agreement and disagreement. Some of Joe’s ideas are controversial and are hotly debated by national leaders of the small school movement and by opponents of the charter school movement.  Joe Nathan- What type of change do you want?

The news business has been changing even before that runner burst through the door, breathless to deliver her earth-shattering news. Nanette Asimov was not in the business that far back, but has been the mainstay of the Education Beat for the San Francisco Chronicle for over twenty years.  Her focus is on state and national issues and has recently begun investigating special education and autism.  Her stories are insightful, informative, and occasionally controversial, as her words describe a vision that is uncomfortable for some.  Speaking with Nanette gives us insight to the person we meet so frequently at our breakfast table.  Nanette Asimov- The Observant Witness.

We have have a quick conversation with Shawna DeNofa

Stan learns about life without Father

When we first met Senior Dad-to-be, Bob Brockob, he was filled with the anticipation of impending fatherhood.  On this his forth visit to our show we have a 10 month check in with Bob to find out how this minimalist architect and education chair of OceanFilmFest.org is adjusting to being the dad of Max and how it has changed his life. 

For some reason the issue of inclusion seems to invoke strong passions.  Everyone views it differently.  Add in the prescription for a least restrictive environment, and wow that gets everyone really churning. You can just see everyone in the room tighten their backs as they set their positions in stone. Walking blindly into this loaded mine field, Senior Dad Stan Goldberg meets educator Paula Kluth, a fifteen year veteran of special education.  Paula has helped schools and school districts transition from exclusion to inclusion. She has held workshops to broaden the understanding of both parents and educators on the benefits of inclusion.  The discussion moves through the hot topics and then on to some common ground when discussing the positive benefits of inclusion (it’s not just that it can be less expensive for a school district).   

Paula Kluth- Everyone is Included 

Stan tells of the tummy ache

What if all your family’s medical history could not be accessed? Not for you parents, nor your grand parents.  It would definitely make it difficult to figure out to which illnesses your child is susceptible. Unfortunately, this is what has happened to medical research and illness data in this country.  Derva Davis, author of “The Secret History of the War on Cancer”, and is the Director of the Center for Environmental Oncology at the University of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute, talks with Senior Dad Stan Goldberg about the negative effects of censoring and withholding information by our Federal Government.  She describes the very real risks we face as we follow this dangerous policy.  Are fear, intimidation, and donor profits now the main driver of government funding?  How can we change the course?  Derva Davis- A voice of courage.

Every parent wants to have a happy child.  Some are born happy and some are not and that’s that.  Maybe not.  Christine Carter, Director of the Greater Good Science Center at University of California at Berkley, shares techniques that you can use to make your child happier.  A child’s feelings of happiness can be adjusted as much as 40%. Senior Dad Stan Goldberg chats with her about happiness habits, the happiness set point, learning how to correct a child’s mistakes without damaging the child, how to raise emotionally literate children, and benefits from altruism.

Christine Carter- Teaching your child happy ways.

Stan visits Mc Donald’s

Do school districts lie to parents of extra needs children? Joann Collins thinks so.  An extra needs advocate for over 15 years and a mother of two grown children with extra needs she has written a book about it. "Disability Deception:  Lies Disability Educators Tell and How Parents Can Beat Them at Their Own Game". JoAnn Talks to Senior Dad Stan Goldberg about the book and how parents can be effective when working with schools and school districts.  They talk about the shocking Autism numbers in the San Francisco schools where 1 in 48 Caucasian children are diagnosed with autism. JoAnn’s view of the current extra needs landscape will open your eyes.  Warning to parents of typical children: you will be shocked to hear what your school district (country-wide) is doing in this emerging civil rights issue.

There was a time that Robyn O’Brien never gave a thought to what she or her family ate.  One day at breakfast, her fourth child ate a scrambled egg, turned red, started looking like a blown up balloon, and changed Robyn’s view of allergies and nutrition forever. Nutrition education became a basic of Robyn’s family. As Robyn learned more about how food is produced, she was alarmed by all the dangers we are never told about. She shares what she has learned in a conversation with Senior Dad Stan Goldberg, as they talk about what to feed your family, the links from genetically engineered milk hormones to breast cancer, prostrate cancer, and ovarian cancer. They talk about government penalties to organic growers, and about school lunches. Robyn O’Brien, “The Mighty Nutritionist”

Stan tells of pets

Heddi Craft is an educator.  She has taught school on most levels K-6 and has been a consultant for the Curriculum Leadership Institute.  After moving to Santa Cruz, California, and beginning to raise a family she noticed how quickly her son learned the lessons from his $12-20 puzzles.  Looking around for a better solution than purchasing more learning tools at the pace of her son’s voracious appetite, she founded the Educational Resource Center of Santa Cruz, a membership based lending library of educational toys, games, and learning materials.  In conversation with Senior Dad, Stan Goldberg, she shares her ideas of “No Child Left Behind”, homework, teacher retraining and actions for parents.  Heddi Craft reaching children differently

Nancy Kalish is an education activist. She frequently appears on the Op-Ed page of The New York Times. She co-authored “The Case Against Homework” with Sara Bennett, a contributor to Senior Dad.  In conversation with Stan Goldberg she alerts us to a key reason our teens seem to be asleep the first period of the day.  After that she fills us in on what’s been happening around the country as homework policies change, including new ideas about school work at home and why some of our children are not learning to love to read.  These topics and more in “Nancy Kalish—Unvarnished Truth”.

Stan tells of raisons

Lice.  Even saying the word can make your scalp itch.  I can remember that creepy feeling each time we received a note form school informing us that lice have been detected in our school.  Check the heads, wash the linens and heads with toxic soaps and think unkind thoughts about the children that brought that unwelcome vermin into our environment.  And then do it again 10 days later. Dale Clayton is an entomologist, a professor at the University of Utah, and he tells us new things about lice, and shatters common accepted beliefs about the little pest.  Dale teaches us that a new way to treat lice that can come to market in less than a year, with no consumables. A real money saver for schools as children don’t miss school and the per diem funding doesn’t slow down.  Dale Clayton, lousebuster. 

Amanda Cockshutt is a PhD, a university professor, a parent, and an advocate for parent’s rights. She lives in eastern Canada and has worked with her local schools to gain a voice for restoring family time.  We chat about language immersion programs, homework, child discipline, and teacher re-education.  Amanda exposes us to some evolutionary ideas and actions by some progressive educators.  Amanda Cockshutt, moving forward softly.

Stan tells of boyfriends at 6

Sir Ken Robinson is one of the foremost critical thinkers in the world today in the fields of creativity, ingenuity, and education.  He is to those fields what Stephen Hawking is to physics. We learn Sir Ken’s views on the best direction for education to change, including No Child Left Behind, Inclusion, ADHD, education and the arts, education for the workplace and equality in schools.

Sir Ken has sampled first hand different types of educational methods.  He was born into a modest income family in Liverpool, the fifth of seven children. He contracted Polio when he was four and was sent to a school for disabled children. Later, he was included in a regular school, went on to university, and then on to an outstanding career in education.  We learn how his background shaped his ideas and provided the foundation for his insightful understanding of education and creativity today.

Marcella Pixley was bullied when she was a girl in middle school.  She had a different developmental clock than the other girls her age, which exposed her to taunting.  As an adult Marcella teaches middle school and sees how much has changed and how much has remained the same. She views daily how preteens relate to each other.  Marcella wrote a hard hitting, truthful gritty novel about her experiences called “Freak” to help young girls and parents understand this difficult growth stage.  We talk with her about the book, how she writes and the effect writing the book had on her. She also shares her hopes about the effect of the book will have on parents and young people.

Stan tells of the slinky tale

If being a teen is so hard, why does it have to be hard for the parent as well? Dr. Anthony Wolf is a nationally known author and child psychologist specializing in Teens. We discuss some of the behaviors we can expect from our children as they become teens, why they appear to hate us and what conflict is going on within the teen.  We also discuss a parent/teen education program that Anthony is working with to engage parents and teens in discussing risk behaviors centered around driving.

John Gilmore is one of the architects of Autism United the collaboration of several New York area autism organizations.  The held a fund raising walk on Long Island to fund a joint project. John tells us how it all started and how the walk came together. Cathy Moriarty is their national spokesperson and John tells us about Katie Wright’s help during the walk.  Stan shares his impressions of the “Jenny on Larry King” and explains his “losing the dream syndrome”.  They both discuss the autism collaborations and mergers of the future.

Stan learns about peanuts

Mel Levine didn’t do well in elementary or grade school.  He had a sense of humor and made his classmates laugh. When his classmates came to his house to play he told his mother to tell them he wasn’t home.  He would rather play with his animals and play in his own mind.  His older brother got into Harvard and had Mel visit him on weekends. These visits excited Mel’s mind and he became an A student from then on.  Mel’s brother found the way in to help Mel learn. Mel graduated first in his class at Brown, became a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford, went to Harvard Medical School and is now the Director of the University of North Carolina Center for the Study of Development and Learning.  Mel is one of the leading figures in the world in the study of the different ways that people learn.  Mel doesn’t believe that one way or 5 ways or 10 ways fits all. There is a way to reach every child we just have to follow the clues.  Mel spurns labels like “Autism”, “Bipolar”,  “ADHD” and likes to visualize the child as they will be at 24.  Mel founded the All Kinds of Minds Institute and has changed the way we view learning, all because a kind older brother took the time to find the way in. We learn who Mel is and what he thinks of the world around him.

The divorce rate among parents with children with extra needs is reported to be 85% within the first five years of diagnosis. Mary McFarland nationally know Oakland California based Psychotherapist discusses these startling figures. We explore the possible reasons for this and actions that couples can take to reduce the chances of divorce.  Although this show focuses on parents with extra needs children it can apply to all parents.

Stan views the start of the school year

David Alexander went to Public School 152 in Brooklyn New York.  He later became a physician, ran two hospitals, and most recently has been appointed CEO of one of the most prestigious children’s health foundations in the nation, The Lucile Packard Foundation for Children’s Health.  David has learned from the journey and shares with us his vision for the future, and where he would like to lead the Foundation. A helping hand for children’s health

Alison Davis and her husband have 3 boys with Autism. In the eight years since the first child was diagnosed her family has grown stronger.  Alison believes that the mercury that was used as a preservative in inoculations she received before and during her pregnancies has a relationship to her children's autism. Alison has learned how to be an effective advocate for her boys.   She spends a large amount of time looking for new ways to help her boys.  She shares her knowledge with many people through email and continues to speak out for action against this raging epidemic.  Alison Davis a voice from the front lines.

Grandma has help

The Wisdom of Deb Meier

One of the founders of the modern day small schools movement Deb Meier looks back at the small school movement and sees dangers she never envisioned.  Still a supporter of small schools she sees nonetheless a possibility for oppression.  Deb tells us what she thought when she started the modern day small school movement years ago in Harlem.

Rich Bruni has been a High School history teacher in the San Francisco schools for over twenty years.  Teaching has been a second career for Rich he was an auto mechanic.  Tinkering with motors trained him to tinker with minds.  He is out spoken, bold, acerbic, opinionated and sometimes down right irritating but through it all he is an observer of our times. In this segment we talk about gangs.

grandma comes to visit

Holly Seerly is the mother of a child with ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) and Dyslexia.  She faces the issues that normally confront a parent with a child with those conditions, but when he was in middle school, a new condition arose; Post Traumatic Stress Syndrome (PTSS), and Holly’s challenge was intensified.  We’re all venerable to having a child or parent with PTSS.  Holly shares what it is like. 

Jose Barillas is the Principal of Thurgood Marshal Middle School in Chicago IL and is a hero.  I thought about our conversation for 1 month after we recorded it before I could edit it. His story so gripped and troubled me I needed the time to gather perspective. He has taught for 30 years. His school which is a small school (400 students) has been selected one of the “Schools to watch”.  Now in the sunset years of his career he looks at what has changed and what needs to be done. Jose’s school has 97% free lunch and 85% Latino.  Jose helps us understand what is happening with parental involvement at his school and how it affects the children

A large number of African American students in the San Francisco Unified School District are behind academically. Bennie Wright an African American is a native San Franciscan. She went to the public schools here and is a college graduate. She is involved in her community and shares with us her views of the school system and how well we are serving the African American community.  This is one part of a multi part view. 

Meet Shawna DeNofa, during her eighth month of pregnancy with her second child she found out that her first child had autism.  It lead to the most trying year of her life. Adjusting to a new world she and her husband learn to adjust and adjust and adjust. Now, several years later she helps strangers become new friends (other parents who have children with autism) by answering questions on a autism listserv. Shawna is on constant lookout for any information that might benefit her son. Shawna’s strength and devotion to her family makes Shawna someone you are proud to know.

Pat Howey has been an advocate for children with extra needs for over twenty years. This week we talk about every child having an IEP and then we move on to the best ways to teach children in a school environment.  We hear plenty of Pat Howey stories that help us understand how school officials view things

Stan makes a mistake

The environment that a child learns in can determine outcome.  At school how we treat the child not only effects how the child learns but also teaches the child how to treat others. If a teacher uses power, force or abuse to teach, that is what a child will learn. The Grand Traverse Academy in Traverse City MI uses none of these. It is a Bill Glasser inspired school and it uses "a gentle way to teach". Kaye Mentley the superintendent of the school district tells us how they do it

What is safe for children’s skin has changed over the years.  New information and safety precautions come out all the time. Is there such a thing as a good tanning salon? How do I protect my child at day camp? Just how much protection does my child need? Does diet control skin blemishes.  Does sun block keep out the vitamin D my child needs?  Should I allow my child to tan to hide blemishes before a big date?  

Wow, a lot to learn. Dr. David MacGregor San Francisco Dermatologist brings us up to speed on the latest news on the skin care front. He answers all the questions above and more in “Make my children safe from the sun”

A large number of African American students in the San Francisco Unified School District are behind academically.  This week I attended the SF Public Defender’s Juvenile Justice summit. The summit made it clear how these youths view SFUSD. Bennie Wright did not attend the conference.  Her four children (three adopted) have never been involved in the Juvenile Justice system.  Bennie is a native San Franciscan. She went to the public schools here and is a college graduate. She is involved in her community and shares with us her views of the school system and how well we are serving the African American community.  This is part one of a multi part view.

Stan gets pinned down

Joan Williams-Director, Center for WorkLife Law University of California, Hastings has made a study of arbitration's related to discharges because of mandatory overtime and family emergencies. We all could be one sick child away from being fired 

Marie Hoemke was a school nurse for almost 40 years. She tells us what the Health Department was like 40 years ago and how it changed and why. Candid, unabridged and straight from her heart. In part 2 she tells us what is not happening in the schools.  Does this create a danger for staff and children? You decide.

Michael Klonsky is a small school advocate. He has worked for the University of Illinois, Chicago for years and took part in the small school studies of the 1990's.  In this first part of a two part conversation Mike tells us about small schools and why they were started.

Stan learns "Why couldn't I play with the car door?".

Marie Hoemke was a school nurse for almost 40 years. She tells us what the Health Department was like 40 years ago and how it changed and why. Candid, unabridged and straight from her heart. Part 1

Michael Klonsky is a small school advocate. He has worked for the University of Illinois, Chicago for years and took part in the small school studies of the 1990's.  In this first part of a two part conversation Mike tells us about small schools and why they were started.

Bill Glasser is a psychiatrist who developed Choice theory he also has a position on redefining mental health. There are 12 schools in the country designated as Glasser Schools which means they teach the Choice theory as part of their curriculum.  Bill is truly one of the great creative thinkers of our time and in this second part of our multi-part conversation with Bill we learn about what Bill thinks we should teach in schools.

Stan learns "No, mountain too high".

Bill Glasser is a psychiatrist who developed Choice theory he also has a position on redefining mental health. There are 12 schools in the country designated as Glasser Schools which means the teach the Choice theory as part of their curriculum.  Bill is truly one of the great creative thinkers of our time and in this first part of our multi-part conversation with Bill we learn some of the events that shaped his thinking.

Up and coming children's book author Connie Lee Berry chats with us about how she creates children's books and what inspires her.

Katy Franklin, San Francisco mother of an autistic child joins us for her final segment on experiences she had while raising her son. Katy puts us all on the spot with simple questions that compare the treatment of children with autism with segregation. Is there a difference?

Stan learns another lesson from a soon to be six year old.

We hear from new Sr Dad Bob Brockob (64), his wait is over and he speaks with us as he holds his new son Max.

Up and coming children's book author Connie Lee Berry chats with us about volunteering in schools and why she choose to switch from public schools in Florida and go private 

Raising children takes a lot of work on the parents part.  A welcoming school or school district can make all the difference. Katy Franklin, San Francisco mother of an autistic child gets a reception she doesn't expect.

Stan shares a counting lesson.

In our Briefing Room 

Jake Vigdor is Associate Professor of Public Policy Studies and Economics of the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy of Duke University. Their latest study looks to see if K-6 is better than K-5 for children.  The Duke research has a chart that shows a significant improvement in behavior in the K-6 environment vs. the K-5 and that that behavior change carries forward for several years.  It also mentions that the students were behind in scores and caught up during the sixth grade in K-6, although that finding needs more thought.  There is also the factor that if you configure schools K-6, 7-9, 10-12 the ninth graders would have a more immature social structure and possibly reduce some of the issues connected with being a ninth grader in a high school. 

Ingrid Shafer has team taught at the college level for 40 years at the University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma. She is a Professor of Philosophy and Religion and more degrees to boot.  She is a new friend and I asked her how we should teach our quicker learners. That's where our conversation started.  I hope you enjoy listening to Ingrid as much as I enjoyed thinking with her.

Healthy Schools- Pamela Wolfberg forward thinking educator lets us see her vision of future education and how we plan for the rising rate of Autism in "We are all included" part 2

Rachel Cytron-Miller is the Deputy Director for Programs for Harlem RBI and after school program that reaches 650 at risk kids in a disadvantaged section of NYC.  Surrounded by gangs, violence and a school system in distress, this program is making a difference.

In our Briefing Room 

Jake Vigdor is Associate Professor of Public Policy Studies and Economics of the Terry Sanford Institute of Public Policy of Duke University. Their latest study looks to see if K-6 is better than K-5 for children.  The Duke research has a chart that shows a significant improvement in behavior in the K-6 environment vs. the K-5 and that that behavior change carries forward for several years.  It also mentions that the students were behind in scores and caught up during the sixth grade in K-6, although that finding needs more thought.  There is also the factor that if you configure schools K-6, 7-9, 10-12 the ninth graders would have a more immature social structure and possibly reduce some of the issues connected with being a ninth grader in a high school.

Homework has been the mainstay of American education for the last 75 years.  Like hemlines, the perceived need rises and falls as the market demands.  Homework can be a polarizing issue. Some parents crave more homework assignments for their children while others seek a way of removing their children from what they view as a treadmill going nowhere.  Within families there may be sometime divisiveness and acrimony over homework and some parents would rather retire from their role as the homework warden in the eyes of their children

Briefing Room- Heather McCracken created Friend 2 Friend Social Network. It is a place for children with and without autism can play together as equals.  Heather saw a need, acted and has helped thousands

First Person- John C Dvorak is a leading Tech reporter, editor, writer, media star ,blogger (Dvorak.org/blog) and has been a curmudgeon for years. John shares his views with us about parenting.  John tells us how he home schools his daughter.  

Middle School- Gayle Andrews is a middle school expert. This week Gayle tells us what to look for in a middle school and what not to do with the brightest kids.

In our Briefing Room 

Jake Vigdor of Duke University tells us the differences between the sixth grade in a K-5 school and a K-6 school. Is there a difference?

Jo Debolt tells us how a school district improved it's scores without spending a ton of money.

Stan posts a audible children's story download for young children (5-7) on the Briefing Room page for download.

Briefing Room- Heather McCracken created Friend 2 Friend Social Network. It is a place for children with and without autism can play together as equals.  Heather is someone you should know.

Healthy Schools- Ellie Goldberg on what schools can do for the child with allergies.

Bob Brokob our 64 year old father to be checks in.

First Person- John C Dvorak is a leading Tech reporter, editor, writer, media star ,blogger (Dvorak.org/blog) and has been a curmudgeon for years. John shares his views with us about parenting.  John is a vocal supporter of home schooling.. 

Stan tells of caught in the process.

In our Briefing Room 

Jake Vigdor of Duke University tells us the differences between the sixth grade in a K-5 school and a K-6 school. Is there a difference?

Jo Debolt tells us how a school district improved it's scores without spending a ton of money.

Stan posts a audible children's story download on the Briefing Room page

Briefing Room- Heather McCracken created Friend 2 Friend Social Network. It is a place for children with and without autism can play together as equals.  Heather is someone you should know.

Healthy Schools- Ellie Goldberg on what schools can do for the child with allergies.

Bob Brokob our 64 year old father to be checks in.

First Person- John C Dvorak is a leading Tech reporter, editor, writer, media star ,blogger (Dvorak.org/blog) and has been a curmudgeon for years. John shares his views with us about parenting.  John is a vocal supporter of home schooling.. 

Stan tells of caught in the process.

In our Briefing Room 

Jake Vigdor of Duke University tells us the differences between the sixth grade in a K-5 school and a K-6 school. Is there a difference?

Jo Debolt tells us how a school district improved it's scores without spending a ton of money.

Stan posts a audible children's story download on the Briefing Room page

Healthy Schools- Pamela Wolfberg forward thinking educator lets us see her vision of future education and how we plan for the rising rate of Autism in "We are all included" part 1.  

Briefing Room- Eric Mar is a father, husband, full time educator, activist and incidentally a member of the school board of San Francisco Unified School District. What motivates a man to take such a thankless job. Is it a stepping stone or is there something deeper? This week part 2 of a three part series, learning "what makes Eric tick".  We learn his feelings on all the major issues facing us now and for some time in the future. Some of what he says may upset you. 

Healthy Mind- The Queen of Bipolar Rosalie Greenberg, the zany outspoken author of the new book "Bipolar Kids" says what she thinks about giving kids medications that have not been tested on kids.

Stan tells of the moment of truth.

Briefing Room- Eric Mar is a father, husband, full time educator, activist and incidentally a member of the school board of San Francisco Unified School District. What motivates a man to take such a thankless job. Is it a stepping stone or is there something deeper? This week we start a three part series, learning what makes Eric tick.  We learn his feelings on all the major issues facing us now and for some time in the future. Some of what he says may upset you. 

Healthy Mind- David Elkind Internationally renowned child psychologist joins us for the part two of a two part conversation. David is most direct and shares the best way to give your child a great advantage.

Healthy Schools- Laura Plunkett's son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was 7.  It took the help of the entire family to pitch in and see that he remained well. A story of a family becoming stronger by fighting an issue together

Stan tells of another step towards the moment of truth.

Healthy Mind- David Elkind Internationally renowned child psychologist joins us for the first of a two part conversation. We talk about if computer games encourage violence, is there value to homework and are there benefits to play.

Healthy Schools- Laura Plunkett's son was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes when he was 7.  It took the help of the entire family to pitch in and see that he remained well. A story of a family becoming stronger by fighting an issue together

Briefing Room- Barry Blesser is a retired MIT professor. He is creative, innovative and one of the creators of digital sound in computers. This week Barry tells of sound and space and how we are becoming disconnected.  Hear the always interesting Barry Blesser.

Ellie Goldberg gives us a quick tip 

Stan tells of playdates to build friendships.

Nutrition- Steve Joseph started a war against Trans fat. He went up against the largest food companies in this country and won! He was instrumental in getting the Federal Government to require all food manufacturers to list Trans Fats on their product labels. Hear his story. 

Healthy Schools- Barry Blesser is a retired MIT professor. He is creative, innovative and one of the creators of digital sound in computers. Barry now directs his energy towards teaching parents how to save their children's hearing while there is still time.  Hear the always interesting Barry Blesser.

Healthy Mind- Ellen Notbohm has a child with Autism. Today 1 in 150 children have been diagnosed with Autism. Hear what she did to help her child and how the family became closer and how her son is doing at 13.

Ellie Goldberg gives us a quick tip 

 

Stan tells of a supermarket dictator.

Ellen Notbohm, Author and mother found out her youngest child had Autism, hear her journey in first person.

We have a new homework position on the Homework Primer page.

Andy Krackov, Senior Director of Public Information for the Lucile Packard Foundation for Children's Health helps us understand what is in their 2007 study "How Bay Area Parents Say their Kids are Faring-2007".

Denise Pope, Stanford Professor and Author covers homework, parenting, playtime and parental stress and needs for the future.

Stan tells of the Farmers Market.

Denise Pope, Stanford Professor and Author of "Doing School" starts a two part interview with a story of over programmed and misdirected kids striving to become robots in an leave no prisoner environment. This far reaching two part series covers homework, parenting, playtime and parental stress and needs for the future.

We are testing a new homework survey.  This survey can be used by a school or PTA as a barometer to gauge  the status of homework issues at the school.  We can adjust the survey to enable a school or PTA to receive their data separate from the total data.  To get a special survey send Stan an email at Stan@srdad.com . To download a standard survey click the yellow box on the left to get the PDF file.

Sara a sophomore in High School dates the wrong boy. Her world is spun around and she almost dies. Hear her story of "dating the boy down the street"

" The quality of education a child with a disability receives is directly related to the advocacy skills of the parent".  Says Pat Howey a parent whose child's illness turned her into an advocate for children with extra needs. Pat tells us how to be an advocate in the last part of a three part series.

Stan tells us he wishes he had three hands.

Mary McFarland, Oakland California Psychotherapist discusses the need for 'Parent Brainstorming" sessions at public schools and how this will help develop "community linkage". She also talks about students and alcohol and drug abuse, eating disorders and diabetes.

" The quality of education a child with a disability receives is directly related to the advocacy skills of the parent".  Says Pat Howey a parent whose child's illness turned her into an advocate for children with extra needs. Pat tells us how to be an advocate in part 2 of 3.

The San Francisco Unified School District is improving because of increased parent involvement. Dana Woldow (a 20-40 hour @ week volunteer) committee co-chair of the student nutrition and physical activity committee wanted to feed more disadvantaged kids breakfast. Hear how far they have gotten and the adjustments they made along the way.

Stan tells us of friends lost.

" The quality of education a child with a disability receives is directly related to the advocacy skills of the parent".  Say's Pat Howey a parent whose child's illness turned her into an advocate for children with extra needs. Pat tells us how.

Mary McFarland, Oakland California Psychotherapist helps us to understand some of the mental stress facing young people today, from the young student to the teenager.

Amy Lanou our Nutrition specialist shares what is best to feed a child for lunch.

Stan tells us of boundaries assigned.

Dana Woldow a San Francisco volunteer is co-chair of SFUSD student nutrition and physical activity committee and feels that Catering trucks should be treated like Medical Marijuana Clubs, and kept 1000 feet from schools.  Hear her in our nutrition segment.

Sharp rise in girls pressured to have sex, Zephira Derblich-Milea tells us what's behind the numbers. Download the 2006 study from Liz Claiborne and listen along.

Ellie Goldberg updates us on Asthma in the schools and we have 3 downloads about Asthma on our Healthy Schools page.

This week we hear a "First Person" account from Katie Russell, a mother of a first grader whose family life is at risk because of homework. Our Homework "Guru" Sara Bennett gives Katie some advice.

Stan has a conversation with Amy Lanou the author of "Healthy Eating for Life, for Children". What should your child eat at lunch? Plus other reveling subjects. Look at our Lunch Box page for useful downloads.

We have a candid conversation with Middle School expert Gayle Andrews about paying for our schools, also what works best when teaching and some new approaches to teaching.

Stan tells us about a stomp rocket tale. Stan asks for the Hijacked Family Time to be freed.

This week Jo Debolt one of three team members appointed by the State of Pennsylvania to be a trustee of the Duquesne School District tells us how the 98% African American School District was turned around without investing tons of money but by actually finding a cause of the issue.

We have a candid chat with Middle School expert Gayle Andrews about what makes Middle Schools work.  Gayle talks directly and never ducks an issue.

Stan tells us of a "out of the box" parent moment.

Gayle Andrews one of the coauthors of "Turning Points 2000" and "Making the most of Middle School" joins us and tells us what to look for in a Middle School, shares her thoughts about tracking, homework, evaluating education and makes us aware of a new curriculum guidance for Math from the National Council of Teachers of Mathematics that shows us what a child should learn, called "Focal Points for Prekindergarten Through Grade 8 Mathematics".

Ellie Goldberg our Healthy Schools consultant returns for another chat about what we can do to make our schools a healthy school. Ellie specializes in educational planning for children with chronic health issues.

We meet a new Sr Dad to be Bob, Brockob and Stan starts a bicycle tale that might be headed towards some rough road

This week we start to look at one of the most complex issues that face all who seek equality in education, the achievement gap.  Why do some students start kindergarten behind and why do others fall behind as they go from grade to grade? Is it race? Is it poor schools? Is it bad teachers? Dr.Todd Risley, the noted researcher gives us some surprising answers that if we act on can alter school performance with low cost within a few years.

Ellie Goldberg our Healthy Schools consultant returns for another chat about what we can do about healthy schools and  Ellie alerts us to the danger signals and warns us what we can do about them. Ellie specializes in educational planning for children with chronic health issues.

The memories we have during the holidays can start with parents giving of themselves to their children, Stan remembers gifts he received. Stan also rants on newspapers like the NYT slanting the view of charter schools. 

Send in questions for future shows for our experts on homework, Sara Bennett and our expert on healthy Schools, Ellie Goldberg. Click their email links today.

Schools can make your child sick.  This week we interview Ellie Goldberg a Healthy Schools consultant about the environment in our schools that can turn well children into sick one.  Ellie alerts us to the danger signals and warns us what we can do about them. Ellie specializes in educational planning for children with chronic health issues.

We also interview Gloria Corral, the deputy director of First5SF. This is one of the agencies that receives state money to establish universal preschools in California.  We check in with Gloria and learn of their progress and directions. 

Lastly we have an instance of where forgetting what you look like in the mirror can prove almost fatal. 

This week we start accepting questions for future show for our expert on homework, Sara Bennett and our expert on healthy Schools, Ellie Goldberg. Click their email links today.

When we start dating in school sometimes we need our friends to watch out for us, when we are at parties  or when our boy friends or girl friends try to control our lives.  This week Zephira Derblich-Milea  speaks with us about date rape, violence against men and women and how children can work together in schools to protect themselves.

We also hear from two directors of preschools to learn what they are teaching preschoolers today while being guided by the principles of Reggio Emilia.  This week we interview Heather Morado Director of GeoKids in Menlo Park Ca and Kathleen Forhan Director of Old Firehouse School in Mill Valley Ca.

Stan shares a special parenting moment his daughter gave him.

How do we make our schools safer?  Date rape, controlling the movements of boyfriends or girlfriends, bulling and name calling, are a few things that make schools difficult.  Not only people treating other people incorrectly, but also the actual buildings we send our children to school in could be causing health problems.  This week we interview Paul Kivel the author of “I can make my world a safer place”.

We also start hearing from people involved with preschool education to learn what they are teaching preschoolers today while being guided by the principles of Reggio Emilia.  This week we interview Pam Schneider the Early Childhood Education Director of the JCC San Francisco who operate three Reggio Emilia preschool and Cathy Green Executive Director of the Kumara School in Mill Valley California.

We also share the end of soccer season and respects for parents but a gripe about schools being shortchanged

Homework-We complete our interviews with four authors who have written the book on homework, Harris Cooper author of  "The Battle over Homework”, Sara Bennett author of “The Case Against Homework”,  and Alfie Kohn author of “The Homework Myth” and John Buell author of “ Closing the Book on Homework”.

We have two different takes on choices, when is the right time to stand on your own?

Homework-It is an issue in many households.  We continue our interviews with four authors who have written the book on homework, Harris Cooper author of  "The Battle over Homework”, Sara Bennett author of “The Case Against Homework”,  and Alfie Kohn author of “The Homework Myth” and John Buell author of “ Closing the Book on Homework”.

We also learn of the kind actions of the "Ninny Fairy" and hear how a parent can turn their child's love of sport into front page news.

Homework-Talking about it can make some parent's blood boil.  We start our interviews with three authors who have written the book on homework, Harris Cooper author of  "The Battle over Homework”, Sara Bennett author of “The Case Against Homework”,  and Alfie Kohn author of “The Homework Myth” . Next week we add a fourth John Buell author of “ Closing the Book on Homework”.

We hear some "bath talk' and get an update on the news.

What can be learned from road rage, quite alot if you weren't the one making a fool of yourself in front of your child.  We start looking at homework this week, does it make sense or are we just training our children to grind away.  We take a look at the news events that may have an impact on our lives from the past week.

We teach our children and if we pay attention we can learn from them too.  This week we have three segments.  In one I teach and learn with my daughter, in another I pass on something I learned from my father and lastly what the soccer team members and parents learn from each other.

In the coming weeks we will be talking about homework.  You can add your thoughts to the show by calling 415-838-8442.  Is homework good or bad in the early grades?  Homework horror stories?

Is the bird flu a big scare by the drug companies or is it the real thing. We talk about that this week. Also when should we stop to listen to small voices and a segment on calls from school.

Should we have free preschools from age 2? We look at this issue this week. More health concerns this week for us all.  Vacation or trip, the Russian roulette of time off.

I don't know where men or women come from but it's not Pluto.  We discuss possible bird flu pandemic and the plans that are being made.  We look at flu shots for the young and old and share kindergarten back to school night.  
This week we discuss some of the challenges of early parenthood. We tell about another visit to Firefly, some visits to the doctor and our first experiences as a soccer coach.
This is our first show. Hear it and tell us what you think.  We cover pre-school issues and some of the differences between parenting in the 1960’s when my first set of children were born and now.  comment to feedback@srdad.com.
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